During my class today a whirring noise started coming from the pipes in the ceiling. Suddenly, they started leaking brown liquid which covered the floor and leaked out the second story window onto the sidewalk below. The Ohio State University.

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For more information on Classrooms of Shame, please contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

During my class today a whirring noise started coming from the pipes in the ceiling. Suddenly, they started leaking brown liquid which covered the floor and leaked out the second story window onto the sidewalk below. The Ohio State University.

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For more information on Classrooms of Shame, please contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

Yet another dead roach on the floor in my office. They’re also frequent classroom visitors. Maybe once the new university center opens next door, the insects will all hang out there instead? (Private university, midwest.)


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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

Yet another dead roach on the floor in my office. They’re also frequent classroom visitors. Maybe once the new university center opens next door, the insects will all hang out there instead? (Private university, midwest.)

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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

This is some of the “water” that has leaked through our ceiling.  Despite “urgent” requests to maintenance, we have yet to have anyone stop by our lab.  A fun new update: the water we’ve collected in plastic containers is eating through the plastic.  Good times had by all!
Location: A well-known private Catholic university in the Midwest

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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

This is some of the “water” that has leaked through our ceiling.  Despite “urgent” requests to maintenance, we have yet to have anyone stop by our lab.  A fun new update: the water we’ve collected in plastic containers is eating through the plastic.  Good times had by all!

Location: A well-known private Catholic university in the Midwest

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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

Mold—Deal With It

I have a submission for your Tumblr; however, it’s just a story and not a photo, since I resigned from my position where I had to teach in this classroom. There were many things terrible about this classroom, including insufficient and unreliable lighting, technology that would not work with my Mac (“too bad,” I was told by IT), fixed seats unsuitable to a discussion-based literature course, and a basement location.

But what made it truly a Classroom of Shame is that it was infested with mold. The facilities folks put in two dehumidifiers as a response to the problem, but it was impossible to run them and also hold a discussion, due to the noise. Every time I had to teach, my ears turned bright red and itchy (a reaction from the mold) and my allergies and those of students acted up. It was a health hazard, and the administration knew about it, and all they did was offer two dehumidifiers and told us to deal with it.

This was at a private liberal arts college in the Midwest.

Rats, Roaches, and Students Passing Out

I am a tenured professor in the humanities at a flagship public university in the Northeast. In the latest chancellor’s latest pursuit of excellence, the university has built impressive, state-of-the-art science and residential buildings all over campus. It also recently overspent about $2 million in public funds in its ongoing, misguided effort to expand the football program.
On the humanities side of campus, rats, roaches, and even spontaneous fires have become no big deal.  At the start of every semester, students pass out in the un-air conditioned classrooms (which regularly get over 95 degrees), but we wear our coats in the winter because the broken windows were repaired with cardboard and duct tape.  
In my office, pink liquid has been slowly oozing from the ceiling and down the wall for the last five years.  I have put in several maintenance requests, but two different campus unions are in arbitration, trying to decide who is responsible for dealing with the mess. Indigent individuals live in the stairwell and sponge bathe in the restroom.  An undergraduate woman was attacked in the lobby of the building last year.  
This semester I’m teaching  in the old gymnasium, in the classroom next to the swimming pool.  It stinks of chlorine and is incredibly humid.  It also has a window that looks out onto the pool.  Last time I taught in this room, it was during swim team practice; fortunately, the pool hasn’t been in use (yet) this semester. The room has no technology, unless you count the old overhead projector chained to the wall.  It’s a film studies class.
I put my room change request in months before the semester started, but I’m not hopeful.  They already ignore my disability accommodations, why should I expect them to care about my instructional requirements?
I once taught at a SLAC in the Midwest as an adjunct. The English comp classroom I was in was only accessible by walking through the gym across the basketball court; you interrupted games and during class you heard “pound pound thud clang pound.” The locker rooms were next door, so the room smelled rancid — hot, sweaty, foul. I asked for a room change, and the only available one was a chem lab in a posh new science building. Smelled great, but big black lab desks weren’t ideal for group discussion. That was my first stint there and I actually had an office with a window. I came back for more.

The second stint my office was literally just the *end of a hallway* in the building I taught where there were some available chairs. When my students wanted to meet they had to email me to set up an appointment to meet me “at the blue chairs.”


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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)

I once taught at a SLAC in the Midwest as an adjunct. The English comp classroom I was in was only accessible by walking through the gym across the basketball court; you interrupted games and during class you heard “pound pound thud clang pound.” The locker rooms were next door, so the room smelled rancid — hot, sweaty, foul. I asked for a room change, and the only available one was a chem lab in a posh new science building. Smelled great, but big black lab desks weren’t ideal for group discussion. That was my first stint there and I actually had an office with a window. I came back for more.

The second stint my office was literally just the *end of a hallway* in the building I taught where there were some available chairs. When my students wanted to meet they had to email me to set up an appointment to meet me “at the blue chairs.”

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For more info on this Tumblr contact Karen Kelsky at gettenure@gmail.com (http://www.theprofessorisin.com)